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DEC
24
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France Will Impose Digital Services Tax in 2019

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire announced on 17 December, 2018, that France will begin taxing digital services on January 1, 2019.


The tax will be paid by large digital companies.  Le Maire specifically mentioned Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon, but other large digital service providers would also be affected.  The announcement did not include important details of the new tax, which will be decided upon later in December.  

It is expected that the tax will resemble the proposal from the European Commission, which would amount to 3% on revenues derived from digital activities in which users play a role in value creation.  The EU proposal would apply to companies with annual revenues of 750 million euros and total annual revenues from EU digital activities of more than 50 million euros.  However, as noted, details of the proposed French tax are not yet available.

The government said that these companies pay, on average, about 14% less in tax than domestic companies, and one aim of the tax is to level the playing field.  

The announcement comes as something of a surprise, since France had previously said it would wait until March for other EU finance ministers to agree on a digital services tax before France would take action.  

It is unclear what impact the tax would have on consumers, or how broadly it would apply.

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DEC
24
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IRS Issues 2019 Mileage Rates

On 14 December, 2018, the U.S. IRS provided new optional standard mileage rates for use of an automobile for business, charitable, medical, or moving purposes during 2019.  See Notice 2019-2, and Announcement IR-2018-251.  


The new business mileage rate is 58 cents per mile, up from 54.5 cents per mile in 2018.  The rate for medical and moving use is 20 cents per mile, up from 18 cents per mile in 2018. The rate for charitable use is set by statute, and remains at 14 cents per mile.

The Notice also covers the impact of changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) that affect deductions for automobile use.  The IRS had also noted these impacts in a Notice issued earlier in 2018, see Notice 2018-42.

Unreimbursed automobile costs are no longer deductible as miscellaneous itemized deductions, so the standard mileage rate is inapplicable.The 20 cents per mile rate for use of a vehicle in moving is not applicable to most movers because moving expenses are no longer deductible, except for certain members of the active duty military.

The TCJA suspended the deductions for miscellaneous itemized deductions and moving expenses, through 2025. Previously, there was an allowance for an itemized deduction of miscellaneous business expenses by individuals, to the extent those expenses exceeded 2% of adjusted gross income.

Worldwide ERC® members with business travelers who are incurring unreimbursed travel costs, such as automobile use, will need to determine whether to supplement tax assistance to take account of those costs that are no longer deductible. Note that if a company does reimburse automobile costs at the standard rate of 58 cents per mile, those reimbursements remain not taxable.

Companies will also need to consider how to handle automobile use by employees who are moving. Although many will still choose to use the 20 cents per mile rate for reimbursement, those costs are now taxable and subject to gross-up.

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DEC
21
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Texas Judge Rules the Affordable Care Act as Unconstitutional

Since the Affordable Care Act’s adoption in 2010, the healthcare law has drawn much attention and has been the topic of intense debate. Even today, eight years later, the ACA is still the center of dispute, with the most recent action occurring on November 14, 2018 when a U.S. District judge from Texas ruled the healthcare law as unconstitutional.

This is not the first time there was a focus on shutting down major healthcare system legislation. The ACA has come under intense opposition since its passage, but especially after a Republican administration came into power, and with Congress on its side in both the House of Representatives and Senate, it took pointed attempts to repeal the legislation.

While these attempts to repeal and replace the legislation proved unsuccessful, the Republican-controlled executive and legislative branches still found a way to dismantle the ACA through a piecemeal approach rather than complete overhaul. The Republican-controlled Congress included repeal of the individual mandate in H.R. 1; the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that passed the House, Senate and was signed into law by President Trump on December 22, 2017. The legislation stipulated that the individual mandate penalty would be zero - or effectively repealed - starting in 2019.

The individual mandate is a mandate under the ACA that requires every single American to purchase minimum essential health coverage or pay a penalty when filing your annual federal tax return. This policy served as a balancing figure of the ACA as a way to ensure that both less healthy as well as healthy people who may not always use their health insurance purchase insurance, and therefore balance out premium and overall costs to consumers. Republicans - and specifically the Trump administration - have been eager to remove the individual mandate and have also taken steps such as expanding hardship exemptions so that less consumers are subject to the penalty.

U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor in Fort Worth ruled the ACA as unconstitutional, based on the individual mandate penalty being zeroed out in the tax reform bill, therefore invalidating the ACA in its entirety. Essentially, because the individual mandate was determined to be unconstitutional and is seen as integral to the ACA law as a whole, the law itself should be struck down. This case was raised by 20 Republican state governors and attorney generals. This case will likely rise to an appeal in the Supreme Court. The administration has made it clear that no 2019 plan will be impacted, and they will not attempt to enforce this ruling while the appeals process is still underway.

How This Impacts Mobility

Changing the terms of current health care coverage will impact the decisions of employees as to whether to change jobs, or may determine which states to which they would be interested in being relocated.  The affordability and minimum coverage requirements of health plans will play a factor for many individuals as to where they work.  The ACA also has provisions such as insurance subsidies that make it easier for individuals to forgo employer-sponsored health plans.

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DEC
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UK/EU Prep for Potential of No-Deal Brexit Scenario

Dec 21 2018

Published in: Public Policy

| Updated Apr 27 2023

The United Kingdom (UK) is inching closer toward the possibility of a no-deal Brexit, which would have significant implications for the mobility industry. In preparation, the UK Cabinet has initiated plans for the possibility of the UK leaving the European Union on March 29, 2019 without an agreement on Brexit in place. The UK Minister of Finance has set aside a total of $6.2 billion pounds, and the UK Minister of Defense has allocated 3,500 military personnel should such a scenario come to pass.

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DEC
20
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Senate Confirms Kathy Kraninger as New CFPB Director

The Senate has voted narrowly (50 – 49) to approve Kathy Kraninger as the new Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

Kraninger will take over for acting Director Mick Mulvaney, who is currently the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and the incoming White House Chief of Staff. Kraninger reported to Mulvaney at OMB prior to her appointment. Previously, she worked in the U.S. Senate and in the George W. Bush Administration in homeland security roles. It remains to be seen if Kraninger will have the same approach as her predecessor, who drastically scaled back the agency’s enforcement actions and oversight.

It is likely that Kraninger will proceed in a quieter manner than her predecessor, who was quite vocal about his opposition to the Bureau. In fact, Kraninger, who indicated a willingness to reverse the decision to change the name of the CFPB to the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, said on December 17, “I have officially halted all ongoing efforts to make changes to existing products and materials related to the name correction initiative." Analysis by The Washington Post has reported that under the Trump Administration, the CFPB has both contracted in size and drastically reduced the amount of enforcement actions it has taken on behalf of consumers.

Congress established the CFPB as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. The Act consolidated many of the regulatory and oversight functions regarding consumer loans and other financial products previously regulated by several other federal agencies. Congress structured the Bureau as an independent agency with much of its power instilled in its Director.

The relocation of a transferee often involves the sale and/or purchase of a home, and thus, the policies and practices involving real estate directly impact Worldwide ERC® members. The CFPB Director has significant power over many real estate regulations such as the TILA-RESPA rule, with little oversight from Congress, so the policy positions of a specific individual as director determines the direction of the Bureau.

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DEC
14
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Bill to Restore Moving Expense Deductions

Dec 14 2018

Published in: Public Policy

| Updated Apr 27 2023

Congressman Denny Heck (D. WA) has introduced legislation that would allow a moving expense deduction or exclusion for U.S. federal government employees who are moving abroad, or returning from abroad, including moves to or from or between Alaska and Hawaii.  See Representative Heck’s statement, and the bill itself.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) suspended the moving expense deduction/exclusion for the years 2018 through 2025 except for military personnel.  As a result, U.S. federal government employees who are relocated are not allowed a deduction for moving expenses and expenses paid for by the government are included in income.  Although the government eventually achieved the authority to gross up for taxes on these newly includable amounts, a subset of employees (those who are overseas and returning to the U.S. to retire) are not entitled to any gross up.

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DEC
06
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Survey Highlights Reactions to Moving Expense Deduction

Dec 06 2018

Published in: Public Policy

| Updated Apr 27 2023

Prior to its 2018 Global Workforce Symposium in Seattle, Washington in October 2018, Worldwide ERC® conducted an on-line “pulse” survey in which it asked members how their companies were reacting to the elimination of the moving expense deduction/exclusion (MED) by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA).  The TCJA suspended both the deduction and the exclusion for the years 2018 through 2025.  As a result, expenses for household goods movement, and final move travel, are not deductible for 2018, and company reimbursements/payments of those expenses are taxable to the transferee.

A total of 74 members responded, 73 working in corporate HR/mobility departments.  Although there is some inconsistency in the data, overall the survey suggests that companies have generally continued to move employees, pay for the move, and gross up for taxes.

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DEC
03
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Leadership Unplugged, Part 2: Innovation Wins the Day

In our continuing series of highlights from Worldwide ERC® President and CEO Peggy Smith’s Leadership Unplugged interviews at the 2018 Global Workforce Symposium, we listen in on some innovators’ perspectives.

Innovation. It’s one of the hallmarks of disruption done right. When Worldwide ERC® CEO Peggy Smith asked several thought leaders to talk about what’s emerging in today’s mix of advanced technology, mobile people, and creative business approaches, she was the recipient of some remarkable perspectives.

Smith chatted with Tom Dempsey, Vice President, Business Development, Quicken Loans about the proliferation of great ideas, some of which had been incubating for years before they appeared as startup or popup companies. Dempsey spoke about the opportunity that comes from being able to look at one’s business model to find new, better ways to serve customers and add efficiencies - and assume no rules! He pointed out the results that come when innovators can “get outside of the box and really get to what people want.” One example? “Pushing a button and getting a mortgage! The idea that you can harness data and make decisions quickly…it’s exciting to see where technology will go.”  

Liam Brennan certainly saw where technology was going when he launched GT Global Tracker. “You came in and did a little bit of a disruption!” Smith said to Brennan, CEO of the company, which helps employers track their business travelers for compliance with taxation and immigration issues. “What did you see that made you think, ‘I can do better?’” Brennan recalled the period when he and his team were studying business travel issues and could see some concerns that were going to be bigger problems over time: “We started to build a product to try and get ahead of the curve.” Brennan noted that their goal was to preserve the current ecosystem so that their customers wouldn’t need to change business processes that involved IT or HR systems, or their relocation management company. By creating a solution that could “just plug into” the enterprises already connected to the business traveler, it was possible to provide analysis of data that’s already there. Smith then asked Brennan what he saw in the area of “bleisure” (business + leisure trip combinations). He noted that’s another area where close tracking of data helps, as “the combination of work and leisure is leading to situations where the time in country might trigger thresholds for compliance issues.”

Smith invited Heather James, executive vice president, Nomad Temporary Housing to share her viewpoint on innovation in the housing industry. James, who sees her company as the “first true, unbiased aggregator,” noted that the business model is to leverage existing temporary housing inventory in the marketplace with bookings that go out to 950 partners worldwide. She noted that technology is an enabler, but even amid all the new platforms coming out, “The pendulum can’t swing all the way one way or all the way the other. It can’t be totally high-tech, it can’t be, ‘oh we’re going to hold your hand the whole way’…there’s got to be this meeting in the middle so that someone gets the benefit of all.”  

Speaking with Ben Cross, CRP, vice president, business development for University Moving and Storage, Smith noted that the moving industry—one of the oldest in the mobility space—is often a frontrunner in innovation, and embracing new technologies. Cross agreed, noting such enhancements as accelerating and automating documents, and the use of video surveys. He pointed out that video has other possibilities, too, of a more ‘human’ nature: “There’s a real opportunity to incorporate video into the service delivery model,” Cross said. “So you could send the transferee a video, they can self-serve, but they still get that personal feel of having spoken with someone.”  

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DEC
03
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European Union Leaders Approve Brexit Agreement

Dec 03 2018

Published in: Public Policy

| Updated Apr 27 2023

The leaders of the 27 nations that comprise the European Union (EU) have approved the agreement on Brexit, which was reached two weeks ago between the United Kingdom and EU negotiators.

However, the UK Parliament must also approve the agreement with the likelihood of its passage very much in question right now.

On Wednesday, 14 November 2018, Prime Minister Theresa May published the 585-page draft plan outlining the withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Soon after the announcement of the deal, May secured the support of her cabinet, which, however, was followed by the resignation of two of her cabinet ministers opposed to the agreement including the UK negotiator of the deal. Since then, May has faced opposition to the plan from members of the two primary parties.

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NOV
30
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Brazil’s Booming Start-Up Culture

What do you get when you combine a massive middle-class consumption-oriented population, with businesses looking for diversification opportunities, and a supportive community of innovators, mentors, accelerators and investors? In Latin America, the answer is Brazil, a country of more than 210 million which has quickly built a reputation as an ideal start-up ecosystem.

Start-Ups in São Paulo and Beyond

“Brazilian cities consistently make top 10 lists for digital entrepreneurs,” says Ping Jiang, an investor specializing in emerging markets and undervalued investment vehicles. “No list of emerging startup cities would be complete without a mention of Brazil’s São Paulo, which is a fantastic startup environment.” In fact, the city is home to 2,700 active tech startups.

But it’s not just in São Paulo. Across Brazil, states are vying to attract entrepreneurs with incentives and incubation programs. One such program is Seed, developed in the state of Minas Gerais in 2013. This six-month program is “equal parts accelerator, startup ecosystem, coworking space, and angel investor,” says Jiang. Similar programs can be found around the country in cities large and small.

Start-ups selected for São Paulo’s “SP Stars” incubator program benefit from mentoring and advice from international tech leaders like LinkedIn and Cabify.  

Another is Germinadora, which start-up blogger Matt Wright encountered on a recent trip to Brazil. It is an “innovative startup hub trying to change the concept of acceleration and incubation” in which mentors offer their time and talent to support local entrepreneurs. Tech networking events draw people from biggies like Google and IBM, as well as accelerators and incubators and even government representatives, all eager to mentor and support innovation.

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NOV
30
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Supporters Push Action on Transferee Data Privacy Bill

On 14 November, Worldwide ERC®, the American Moving and Storage Association (AMSA), International Association of Movers (IAM) and eight other organizations sent a letter to Senate leaders urging them to pass the Moving Americans Privacy Protection Act (H.R. 4403, S. 998) by the end of the year.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) presently sells the manifest data on vessel shipments to companies that post the information online to paid subscribers. The relocation overseas of a transferee can often require the shipping by vessel of personal goods. Making public the personally identifiable information of the transferee including military personnel exposes them to identity theft, fraud and unwanted solicitations. H.R. 4403 and S. 998 would correct the problem.

In addition to Worldwide ERC®, AMSA, and IAM, the Air Force Sergeants Association, American Foreign Service Association, Association of the United States Army, Association of the United States Navy, Fleet Reserve Association, National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association, National Association of Federally-Insured Credit Union and National Association of Realtors signed the letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-NY). While not a signatory, the Leading Real Estate Companies of the World also expressed its support for the effort.

Congressmen Jeff Denham (R-CA) and Bill Pascrell (D-NJ) introduced the Moving Americans Privacy Protection Act (H.R. 4403) which the U.S. House of Representatives passed by voice vote on 17 May of this year.  H.R. 4403 is a companion bill to S. 998 introduced on 1 May 2017 by Senators Steve Daines (R-MT) and Gary Peters (D-MI).

Related: Worldwide ERC® Engages U.S. Congress on Transferee Data Privacy Bill

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NOV
29
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Impact of U.S. Elections on Mobility

Updated 29 November 2018.

Dear colleagues:  

The movement of government offers clues to the way business will unfold, as new lawmakers enter and others depart. With the recent elections in the United States, we want to provide you with an understanding of the impact such changes could have on mobility.  

On November 6, midterm elections (which occur halfway between presidential elections for open Congressional seats) were held, resulting in Democrats taking control of the U.S. House of Representatives and Republicans expanding their majority in the United States Senate to 53-47. Democrats gained a net of 40 seats in the House.

Democrats taking control of the House significantly shifts the political dynamic in Washington, D.C. for the next two years. Beginning in January, we will see proposals with the progressive tilt of the new House Democratic majority. This will also change the negotiations with the Senate as the more centrist chamber: from one where the Senate would take a more moderate stance than the House to one ensuring conservative principles are included.

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NOV
27
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SPONSORED CONTENT: The Power of Predictive Analytics and Its Value to Your Mobility Program

By Greg Bonnette, Vice President, Strategy & Innovation – Ironside

Predictive analytics may seem like a recent innovation, but the basic concept has been used in various ways for hundreds of years.

For example, the 16th century Italian polymath Gerolamo Cardano (1501-1576) is considered one of the founding fathers of probability. In addition to his interests in mathematics, physics, biology, chemistry, astrology, astronomy, philosophy, and mechanics, he was also an accomplished (some might say incurable) gambler. Not only was gambling an important source of income to Cardano, it also served as the impetus for his Liber de ludo aleae ("Book on Games of Chance") in which he used dice to demonstrate the basic concepts of mathematical probability.

One key difference between Cardano’s mathematical probabilities and predictive analytics today are the number of variables in question. Whether calculating probable outcomes from multiple throws of several six-sided dice or estimating the likelihood of drawing certain cards in a 52-card deck, Cardano only had to contend with a limited data set. Five hundred years later, the sheer quantity of data available and the technology required to process it is changing the way numerous industries—including, now, relocation—conduct business.

Big Data is Small Potatoes for a French Fry Machine

Over the past 30 years alone, Cartus Corporation—Ironside’s partner in pioneering predictive analytics in the relocation industry—has managed more than 2.3 million relocations for employees and their families. Each one of those moves was associated with dozens of interconnected data points related to costs, timings, locations, and more, resulting in a nearly infinite combination of attributes and thus potential causal relationships (i.e., which variable was most responsible for which result).

"Over the past 30 years, Cartus has managed more than 2.3 million relocations for employees and their families.”

Contrast that to someone calculating gambling outcomes based on a fixed set of variables, or even an early life insurance company like Scottish Widows (established 1815) using local church data to create the first actuarial tables of human mortality, and it’s easy to see why the amount of data powering the predictive formulas of old would be considered trivial by today’s computational practitioners.

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NOV
26
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U.S. IRS Announces Inflation Changes for 2019

On 15 November 2018, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) released detailed guidance on the more than 60 tax provisions that are adjusted for inflation each year.

The adjustments for 2019 will generally be used on tax returns due in 2020.

The changes are more extensive than usual due to numerous changes made by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). For example, the deduction for personal exemptions is suspended through 2025, so there is no inflation adjustment; the deduction is zero. In addition, TCJA-imposed “chained CPI” is used for inflation adjustments. This measure of inflation assumes that as prices rise, consumers either forgo certain expenditures or switch to less expensive alternative. It generally results in a lower adjustment than the CPI, which was used previously.

Related: Repayments Under Payback Agreements No Longer Deductible

The standard deduction was roughly doubled by the TCJA. For married couples it rises from $24,000 to $24,400, and for singles from $12,000 to $12,200 for singles. The foreign earned income exclusion rises from $103,900 to $105,900. The Alternative Minimum Tax exemption amount goes from $70,300 to $71,700 ($111,700 for married couples) and begins to phase out at $510,300 ($1,020,600 for married couples). There is no longer any limitation on itemized deductions, so there is no longer an inflation adjustment for that item.

Other adjustments affect the thresholds for the various income tax rates and the amount of income that will trigger the top 37% rate.  

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NOV
20
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Pros and Cons of International Expansion

This article originally appeared in the November 2018 edition of Mobility Magazine.

Companies need to consider a range of factors when deciding to enter a foreign market.

Growing companies may at some point face the prospect of global expansion, as demand increases for products or services in international markets, or to meet other business needs. This is a natural evolution and offers significant opportunities if approached in the right way at the right time.

While going global can make sense, the decision should factor in the overall cost-benefit analysis for a company as well as preparation for a new level of human resources support and administration for staff on assignment. As with any shift in business direction and scope, there are both pros and cons to consider when expanding internationally.

What Are the Factors Affecting International Expansion?

The reasons to expand globally are manifold and will vary depending on the business type and overall market strategies. Companies will be forced to consider a range of factors when deciding to enter a foreign market. These include:

Cost and time to establish a foreign subsidiary.Corporate policy toward compensation and other HR issues.Compliance risk for payroll, taxation, and immigration rules.Establishing secure office premises, employee residences, and bank accounts.Evaluating the growth potential against the required investment.Permanent establishment issues resulting in taxable local revenue.Contingency plans in the event that the new foreign office needs to be closed.

When looking at these factors, a multinational entity will need to decide whether to use a DIY approach to enter the new market or to outsource essential functions to a third party. When the realities of expansion are looked at closely, many of the inherent challenges can be met more easily by using local partners to administer staff assignments, payroll, and immigration compliance.

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NOV
19
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U.S. Passport Revocation Picks Up Steam

Cases are beginning to be filed challenging U.S. IRS certifications of delinquent tax debt to the U.S. State Department that could lead to passport revocation or denial.

According to the IRS, some 20 cases are now before the U.S. Tax Court, and one in a U.S. District Court, raising a variety of issues.

These reflect increased IRS activity under the passport revocation law. According the agency, as of 14 September 2018, over 280,000 cases had been certified to the State Department.

Included in the 2015 highway bill, signed into law by the President on 4 December 2015, is a revenue-raising provision that requires the IRS to work with the State Department to revoke or deny the passport of any taxpayer with “seriously delinquent tax debt.”

A seriously delinquent tax debt is defined as a tax liability that has been assessed (as opposed to merely asserted) of an amount greater than $50,000, and for which the taxpayer has exhausted all administrative appeal rights. That amount includes penalties and interest in addition to the taxes. The statutory $50,000 amount is adjusted annually for inflation, and is $51,000 in 2018.  

IRS and the State Department began implementing the law 1 January 2018. Notice 2018-1 provides detailed information about the provision and its implementation. Under the law, when the IRS certifies that there is a seriously delinquent tax debt exceeding $51,000, the Treasury Department will transmit that certification to the State Department. The taxpayer will also be notified. Generally, when notified of a qualifying delinquent debt the State Department will give the taxpayer 90 days to resolve the issue, generally by arranging for payment of the debt.  

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NOV
19
0

EU and UK Reach Brexit Deal, Though Fate Uncertain

Negotiators for the European Union (EU) and United Kingdom (UK) have reached an agreement on a Brexit plan.  

On Wednesday, 14 November 2018, Prime Minister Theresa May published the 585-page draft plan outlining the UK’s exit from the EU. Despite the cabinet signing off on the deal Wednesday night, Thursday morning, the plan and PM May began facing some severe backlash. EU negotiators have already agreed to this draft plan and are making it clear that they don’t intend to re-open negotiations.

Though negotiators have reached an agreement, Prime Minister May faces an uphill climb getting the deal approved by parliament. At this point, it seems as if the plan proposed this week is the last chance to strike a deal before the looming deadline. The alternative to a deal is a hard exit in which the UK simply withdrawals from the EU. Both sides are looking to avoid such a scenario.

Related: Mobilizing Your Brexit Strategy

As part of the plan, the UK would end the free movement of people but would create a mobility framework for EU and UK citizens move between the two jurisdictions for travel, studies and work. This would have a direct impact on the ability to transfer employees between the UK and much of the rest of Europe. There are also broader implications regarding Brexit which could result in businesses relocating offices and employees between the UK and EU.

Thursday morning, two prominent cabinet ministers resigned, including Dominic Raab, the Prime Minister’s primary Brexit negotiator. Raab becomes the second person in this position to resign this year. Esther McVey, the cabinet minister who oversees work and pensions also announced her resignation shortly after Raab.

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NOV
19
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France to Begin Examining Social Media for Tax Fraud

Nov 19 2018

Published in: Public Policy

| Updated Apr 27 2023

According to the French Budget Minister, France will be devoting 20 million euros to technology enabling the government to monitor and search social media accounts for indications of tax fraud.  

The initiative is one of several France is undertaking to attack substantial tax losses due to fraud. According to the Budget Minister, fraud leads to tens of billions of revenue losses per year. An “anti-fraud” plan has been approved legislatively, which will include authorization for the government to publicly name those who avoid taxes.

The social medial initiative will involve looking at data voluntarily put on-line by taxpayers to detect possible cases of tax fraud. For example, data might indicate a lifestyle beyond a taxpayer’s reported income or suggest that the person is falsely claiming not to be a resident of France. The data will be used for further investigation. The government pledged that it will scrupulously follow data privacy regulations.

The new plan will be put into effect in 2019.

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NOV
16
0

Business in Brazil: What to Know About the Culture

Brazil is rapidly gaining a reputation as a global business center. With a population exceeding 211 million, it now boasts the sixth largest economy in the world.  

But don’t assume sending mobile assignees to Brazil is the same as in other Latin American locales. Understanding the nuances of the Brazilian business culture is critical to successfully establishing business roots here. As global business consultant Keith Warburton notes, “If you speak to business people who have worked in Brazil they will all tell you the same thing – that the key doing successful business in Brazil is to develop a deep understanding of Brazilian commercial culture.”

If you are sending assignees to Brazil, here are a few cultural nuances to help speed their transition.

Informalities

Brazilians generally are considered an informal, fun-loving people who value their relationships. While an initial business meeting may be somewhat formal, you can expect subsequent meetings to be less so as colleagues become better acquainted.

Mobility professionals or assignees should take time to enjoy small talk before getting down to business, and don’t appear frustrated or inpatient by it, Warburton advises. Those personal relationships are key to getting business done. Stay around after your meeting adjourns to visit in relaxed conversation. And don’t expect a meeting to follow an agenda, assuming it even has one.

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NOV
16
0

The Many Faces of Disruption in the Mobility Industry

What’s the best way to take the pulse of an industry? Talk to some of its thought leaders and tap into their industry expertise, insight and experience! Worldwide ERC® President and CEO Peggy Smith did just that in her Leadership Unplugged series at the 2018 Global Workforce Symposium.

Disruption is in the eye of the beholder: What will it mean for you?

Like every other industry, the global mobility and talent mobility ecosystem is subject to disruption. It can come at any time and from any entity. But disruption doesn’t have to be a scary thing.

As Joleen Lauffer, Executive Vice President of Aires, shared during an interview for the Worldwide ERC® Leadership Unplugged series, “…disruption really leads to a lot of innovation and it makes us all raise our game a heck of a lot faster.”

Is disruption a threat that causes companies to falter, or an opportunity that drives businesses forward? It can be both! There are a few lenses in the mobility industry through which we see disruption emerging:

As the innovator launching a disruptive initiativeAs an organization reacting to a competitor’s innovationAs an industry reacting to outside forces

Your organization may fall into one these three scenarios. No matter what, as Worldwide ERC® President & CEO Peggy Smith noted in her conversation with Lauffer, businesses must be prepared to “disrupt or be disrupted.”

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